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LITTLE SIMZ – SOMETIMES I MIGHT BE INTROVERT | REVIEW

Little Simz’ Sometimes I Might Be Introvert is the latest instalment of musical genius from the London-based rap star. On the route to the album of the year shortlists, across the musical realm’s world stage, Tope Sadiq breaks down his review of the star-spangled project for Gen B mag. 

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ – Lyrical Dexterity 3/5

⏱⏱⏱⏱ – Longevity 4/5

🎧🎧🎧🎧 – Production 5/5

🔥🔥🔥🔥 4/5 overall 

Two years ago, when “GREY Area” hit the world like a comet, Little Simz made it her mission to address non-believers with the famous line “They would never want to admit I’m the best here for the mere fact that I’ve got ovaries” on the hit single ‘Venom’. And, as desired, she was met with such critical acclaim that people were either wondering why they’d never heard of her prior, or whether she was going to be able to maintain the level of excellence displayed on her third LP.

“Sometimes I Might Be Introvert” (an acronym for her nickname “Simbi”) leaves little room for listeners to ignore or doubt Simz’s talent as she takes listeners through a 66-minute, 19-track album that draws parallels to her sophomore LP “Stillness In Wonderland” in its nature. Do not be fooled into thinking SIMBI is simply just an updated version, however – the album is a loaded theatrical performance that projects in full display Simbi’s introverted, outward-facing demeanour and Little Simz’s extroverted, overconfident and proud nature.

With the dramatic, superhero-esque opener “Introvert”, we are posed with the question that the album is trying to answer: “Simz the artist or Simbi the person?” In true introverted fashion, the first half of the album sees her focusing on the profiles of others (such as the luscious “Woman” and the cut-throat “I Love You, I Hate You”, where she addresses her paternal relationship) and her reflection on her status within the UK Hip-Hop scene with the one-two punch of “Speed” and “Standing Ovation”.

The album is a loaded theatrical performance that projects in full display Simbi’s introverted, outward-facing demeanour and Little Simz’s extroverted, overconfident and proud nature.

The second half of the album leads us to a boastful, proud and more superficial Simz, which can be seen as a product of her being in the music industry and enjoying the finer things in life such as being in “Sao Paulo eating palm hearts” (as she mentions on “Rollin Stone” – a throwback sound to her Space Age days). 

Though the insertion of Emma Corrin’s narrations can come across as over-dramatic at times (The Rapper That Came To Tea being a clear culprit), the interludes still do a great job at transitioning the themes and sounds of the album to create an overall cohesive experience.

Drawing strongly from her Nigerian influences, Simz shows that she does not carry last with Point and Kill and Fear No Man, rapping with full confidence on a traditional Nigerian sound akin to the music of the great Fela Kuti. It’s on the former of these two tracks that we get the only other noted feature on the album (Cleo Sol being the first) in Obongjayar, who adds a playful and authentic dimension to the track.

We see Simz come back down to Earth with the heart-pulling “Heart Did You Get Here” (a clear resemblance to Drake’s “Look What You’ve Done”) and “Miss Understood”, the album’s epilogue where she laments over struggles between family and business.

Though not without flaws, Little Simz has yet again shown the world why Kendrick Lamar was right to give her such positive praise 6 years ago, and why now her name cannot be left out of any all-time discussions within the UK.

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